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obama weighed down by a jobless rate higher than any incumbent seeking re-election since fdr win 323 electoral votes, sweep 8 of 9 battleground seats? as the republican party picks up the pieces and looks ahead to 2016, here are lessons hopefuls from both parties might want to keep mind. if you don't define yourself, your opponent will do it for you. romney let the president's early attacks on his personal wealth and business background go largely unanswered. romney's campaign argued after a long and expensive primary, they had to choose how to spend at the time, limited funds, and they had to claim it was better than defenses of his personal record. in the end, obama beat romney by ten points. on the economic values question that was this, which candidate is more in touch with people like you. 53% said romney's polauolicies d favor the rich. just 10% said that about the president's policies. and romney, the first republican nominee in the history of our poll to go into a convention with his personal rating under water and campaign with a painful number, just 47% of voters viewing hi
. in the last week of the election, the obama campaign paid $550 for a single ad in raleigh, north carolina. the romney campaign had to sell out $2,665. the obama campaign bought it way ahead of time. lesson two, the republican brand needs a hard look. the gop favorable rating underwater for two years. it's been nearly five years and the final poll, full poll before the election, just 36% of registered voters said they had a positive view of the republican party. 43% held a negative view. the democratic party's favorable rating in positive territory. though just barely at 42%-40%. more than 20 republican primary debates put immigration on full display. so now as the party debates to modernize, it has to repair the image. and that leads us to lesson three. demographics are destiny. romney won a higher percentage of the white vote than any candidate since ronald reagan in 1994 beating obama among white voters. by 14 points among white women. five points among independents. he won all the groups by more than george w. bush did in 2004. but he lost the election by a wider margin than john kerry
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
. he won by 20 point with whites, he won with women, 56% to 42%. but he lost the election, why? as the obama campaign predicted, the white portion of the electoral dropped. the president carried nearly 8 in 10 non-white voters including 71% of latinos, 73% of asian voters, a whopping 93% of black voters. it remains a real question whether the democratic nominee no 2016 will be able to hold the coalition closer. finally, lesson four. don't ignore the data. the polls matter, more of them are right than wrong. though public polling in the swing states showed the president ahead, the romney campaign sincerely believed until election day that romney would win. why? romney's pollsters assumed the electoral would be wider and older than it turned out to be. the enthusiasm numbers did favor them, but they didn't have enough voters. more than any cycle in recent memory, many republicans bought into an alternative poling universe. in 2016, much of the emphases in both parties will be to match and improve on the obama campaign's data-driven technological juggernaut. at the same time the l
you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy for securing a romney victory would come to grief so kind of spectacularly. i mean, i'm telling you. even the communities who came out to vote, i think, were shocked by their own numbers and by their own power. i mean, when you look at the cuban community in florida, a community that has historically voted super conservative and suddenly see an entirely new generation voting, and you see those numbers that they put up for obama. it was extraordinary. and i think that a lot of folks have very poor sense of what's happening in this country on the ground. i mean, they're kind of all the way up he
elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller: bringing the end to osama bin laden. i think he has done very well. he has been patient and the adult for working with the republicans that tried to make everything for the country. host: president obama amongst others being listed this morning from the phones and facebook and twitter. after thestory passing of senator daniel in a the washington times." host: the code of hawaii -- the governor of hawaii possibly been the replacement for daniel inouye, reported by cbs news. picking up on the remaining time and before the next senate, comes in. president obama spoke on friday and talked about the senator's service and h
up the news of this holiday. then, part two of our conversation about upcomingin elections: house races in illinois and south carolina, an high-profile politics in new jersey. we have two health stories. first, are annual mammogramswn necessary? betty ann bowser examines theil conflicting answers.or >> it's going to result in an excessive treatment required for people that delay getting their cancer detected.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity meas
election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a car. -- survived a the horror. asheville, north carolina, republican line. caller: i would like to say one thing and i think there is a connection that people are overlooking -- i think people especially recently and as far back as timothy mcveigh and the people who crashed into the tent -- twin towers, they are terrorists. terrorist attacks society by creating fear, mayhem, and everything else. is the united states overlooking this? are we creating terrorists? beene young people have t attacking people with assault rif
on it for us. for more on this let's bring in the editor of "campaigns & elections" magazine, shane deapril. campaigns and elections might be appropriate here because some say there is a lot of political posturing going on. you have said the feeling in washington it might actually be better to go over the cliff and come back and negotiate. why? >> yeah. now, this is of course purely political campaign calculation here, tossing aside the nation's fiscal health frankly. for both side i think there is good argument to be made for congressional leaders, democratic leaders and republican leaders in particular, there may be less political risk here actually if we do go over the cliff and figure out a solution very quickly afterwards. if you go back to what happened with plan b, speaker boehner could not get, get that through his caucus in the house simply because you have many republican members sitting in very conservative districts who would absolutely not vet for anything that could put them at risk of a primary challenge in a year from now. frankly, for a lot of those members, voting for plan
, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way business has to do. they have their own agenda of interest groups. the bigger they get, the more harm they do on the less chance you have to improve your lot in life. >> host: how is it free markets make it moral? is morality part of capitalism? >> guest: morality is the basis of capitalism. the whole thing about free markets based on values in meeting the needs and wants of other people. contrary to the hollywood cartoon terra of business people rubbing their hands in "glee" at the misery of others. even if you for money, you don't get it unless you provide a product or service if somebody else wants. so without us even realizing it, it enhances humanity. you have to create cooperation. you have to get people to work with you. you have to persuade. so in that sense, free markets open nothing can go do something. by golly you have the chance to do it and it brings barriers we take it for granted if you start the business and get the best people possible. that's a truism. but the pheno
ultimately burned seven homes. the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbsd on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today as the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s.-allied countries also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria.in in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan, killing 27in people, including the country's head of border security.ll the russian-made aircraft went down near the southern city of shymkent. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy
republican votes in the house. he would get an absolute majority and would not be elected speaker in the first round. >> robert williams says that we need to cut spending. sequestration was a democratic deal. deal with it. guest: i would call that a deal between the republican congress and president. the whole point of sequestration, if we remember, was not to have to take effect. the point was to have such a bad outcome that the super committee that was created in the august 2011 debt ceiling deal be so afraid of the sequestration that they would reach a bipartisan compromise that would reduce deficits by the same amount that sequestration was expected to, but in a much more balanced and sensible way. democrats and republicans were unable to reach an agreement and that is why you have this sequestration. sequestration was never intended to be policy. it was intended to be so bad and foolish than democrats and republicans would be forced to agree to something. obviously, that calculation perhaps mistook the level of disagreement there was between republicans and democrats on this
say more things are on the table than were before the election. the pessimist would say yeah, but there still isn't the substance of an agreement. >> the mechanics, i mean, what we have -- on the obama side, you have an election that pretty much, you know, they took as a mandate, if you will, where, you know, the very issue of taxes was sort of legislative, and the americans basically said they agreed with the president, saying that taxes need to rise on the wealthy. and then you have the right wing of the republican party who won also by wide margins in many deeply conservative districts. and they think they have a mandate. so in a way, it's like the two mandates are canceling each other out. they each think that they are -- and that is why we're frozen. i don't know if it's been that way -- i don't know if the mechanics have been such that it has been so polarized to the point where it's been paralyzing. >> where they feel like they've each won. >> it doesn't baffle me, it sort of angers me is that the conservative republicans who won by overwhelming margins in their distri
of these house republicans were elected with more than 60% of the vote and their constituents don't want them to compromise. >> senator lindsey graham was "meet the press this morning. >> we are one law away from solving this problem. this problem runs deep and wide. i live in south carolina and chuck lives in new york. i understand how he was brought up. maybe he tries to understand how i was rabrought up. people where i live i have been christmas shopping have been coming up to me, please don't let the government take my guns away. >> how realistic do you think that is? >> chuck is my boss. anything chuck says absolutely 100%. >> who said there wasn't politics on the show today? >> it's a rhetorical question because president obama himself has mentioned on the streets of chicago you need one set of gun rules and in wyoming maybe it is something else. i think we have seen that kind of regionalization of laws. connecticut had an assault weapons ban that didn't prevent this tragedy from happening and didn't outlaw the kind of gun you would want to be outlawed for that kind of tragedy. i don't
at ole miss. well, it was not. it was a group of students who didn't like the results of the election, but just a handful of them were throwing out racial slurs, screaming. so that has to be in context. ralph alluded to mississippi today. there's an education presentation, mississippi was, mississippi is. it means they've changed in a way that i think a lot of the northern press was not aware of and was not aware of the racial issue then and probably not aware now. the army had been, thank you, harry truman, the army had been desegregated to a point by the time i got in in 1962 it was flattened out. there was no -- there may have been racism back in the barracks and the tents, but it's not out in the open. alabama pfcs saluted black officers, took the orders from black sergeants. once we left the comfort of the army bases and the posts as we moved south, it was a different culture. that we got into. and, of course, it was a freeze frame, a photograph, a snapshot of rayism that we saw that -- racism that we saw that first morning and continued to see while we were there. so kudos to th
. it is important. president obama has tried togone from what he was elected on, increasing taxes for fairness, a $400,000. that was not enough. this proposal goes to $1 million. $400,000 is plenty comfortable. president has gone a long way. there is a lot of revenue being the fact is lost between $400,000.10 dollars million. we need that revenue to rectify the wrongs. this bill has cut funding. the national institutes of health. our physical cliff. i want to talk to you about how this fiscal cliff affects the physical cliff. it comes up with research dollars to allow for our live to be extended. and bettered. at duke university, there is a great lung transplant program. headed by dr. robert davis. they need the money to perfect the lung transplant program that is the best in the country. it is only a 50% chance that a person will live eight years with a lung transplant. and they do not know why, and they need to find out, and it is national institutes of health funds that will help them find out. in my home town, there is a hospital. one of the finest liver transplant doctors in the country.
in the 1970s. in 2007, she had returned to pakistan from self-imposed exile to run in the general elections. she was killed at a campaign rally. her son was picked to lead her party. >> i am thankful to the cc for imposing their trust in me as chairman of the pakistan people's party. >> reporter: but he was just 19 and studying at oxford. her husband was co-chairman of the party. he ran for president and won. now her son, at age 24, has given his first major speech at the family shrine. and his father seemed proud to launch him into political life. >> translator: his education is finished, and his training has begun. he has to stay with you, with the workers. he has to learn with you. he has to learn about pakistan, learn how to work with you, learn your thinking. >> reporter: he's still too young to run for office but will likely be a figurehead in the general elections, expected within a few months. isha sesay, cnn, atlanta. >>> and the family of nelson mandela is speaking out. >> our grandfather is great. he's doing very well. >> after rumors that mandela was close to death, family membe
, this is what we elected and they're doing everything they can to not pay attention to that and to go to their separate corners and to be separate and to pretend that their way is not the only way. >> and it could result in people being called into, like, their supervisor's offices and their supervisor goes, i'm sorry, people are actually losing jobs because of this. >> but is there what the people voted for? there are some that think this is what the president voted for. >> how can you think that the american people didn't vote for this? >> let me get to these economical reports. there are a number on today's economic calendar. maybe most importantly are the weekly jobless claims, expected to rise by 4,000. and that would be to 356. and at 10:00, new home sales and consumer confidence which will be interesting to do. also this morning, the kansas city fed survey. the lead story in the journal today is a 6.9% rise in house prices so far this year. since january. and some people are saying after some false starts, residential has concerned. >> well, you're right. >> you can have some r
. 18 years later i got elected to congress and i called reagan's secretary and let me see if i can arrange this. they arranged it and mom and kenny came. we parked behind the white house. we went into the oval office and president reagan came over and said, i want to tell you your son is one of the brightest young congressman we have and he is going to do great things. i know you have to wait on tables for 18 years and it worked in a foundry. and danny had to shine shoes. i know it was tough. we had those problems in my family. isn't it great we live in a country where you can achieve anything? all i could think was, how did he know this stuff? he had had his secretary call to find out about me and my family. when i walked out of that office, i would have done anything for that man. he made my mother feel so happy. she was so happy and she carried the picture until she died. her favorite actor was ronald reagan. >> a lesson for that about relationships for president is the personal touch? >> it is a big part of it but it was not just a personal touch. he had goals like the strategi
much of a deficit. >> worry me this question. can you get elected if you say i am going to cut this and cut that unless money flows out. can you get elected f. you reform social security can you get elect medicare or medicaid. you can get elected. i will reform. post office. you can't get elected. >> kelly: you can't take it back. >> once you made the promise to pay how do you with draw. >> clayton: but you can get elected raising taxes. interpeffort the last election. >> julia: we didn't say your name at the beginning of the segment. >> clayton: he doesn't even need an bruction. he's so good. >> julia: this is your guy when you talk about fiscal cliff. >> i am guy with the accent. >> clayton: tune in fox business network . no one does it better stewart varney. ualjullove to your family and beautiful children. >> clayton: teachers trainn to use handgun to protect the school. we report and you decide. julaloha, hawaii. president is heading back to washington. is it too late to avoid the fiscal cliff. you can't answer it because you are leaving now. we'll talk about this next.
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacific region will focus on more cultural, economic assistance as well as military collaboration. even with china itself, we're engaging more with china. this has been from the very beginning of the obama administration and is also part of the pivot. the pivot is not just focusing our attention on the other countries of the asia-pacific to the exclusion of china. it means all of the asia-pacific including china, which is why secretary clinton has been to china seven times. yet had defense secretaries gates and panetta -- we have had defense secretaries gates and panetta and many other cabinet officials go to ch
on deeply held principles. and a lot of these house members got elected in districts that don't look anything like the rest of america. they're very extreme, gerrymandered districts in many case s with ca ca ca cases, and their own personal careers depend much more on how they're perceived back at home. so they don't necessarily care that this is one of the most unpopular congresses in recent history and one of the most unproductive congresses in recent history. they want to stick by their principles. >> it's true. and a lot of them say, eamon, i've been elected to be a check on the president and that's what a lot of this is about. >> right. this is deeply held, fundamental belief on both sides and there's a huge chasm between the two sides on these issues. and somebody's going to be a loser here if there's a deal. somebody's going to be perceived as having gotten rolled and neither side wants to be the party who got rolled here. i think both sides are looking at if fiscal cliff right now and saying, well, we could go over this thing. it wouldn't be the end of the world and that's a
of time thinking about the fiscal cliff or even the 2012 election but we will remember the moments we shared with our family and our friends during the holidays. those memories and the chance to create new ones make this time of year different from any other. more than 2,000 years ago a child was born in a lowly manger who saved a people and changed a world. may you see miracles big and small next week and in the new year. and that is it for us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm in for bill o'reilly. please remember the is spin it stops right here because we are always looking out for you. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> sean: marry christmas and welcome to this hannity holiday special. in a few minutes we will take you to afghanistan for an exclusive look at how our troops stay connected to families back home during the holidays. and we will also hear a timeless message from president ronald reagan recorded 32 years ago but still just as meaningful tonight. first, pastor rick wa warren hs book the purpose driven life has been read by more than 60 million people worldw
't alienate all our union campaign supporters that just got us elected. or would we actually deal with an economy that is struggling possibly even a one-two punch with a fiscal cliff and strike. all this could return 30 days from now. >> indeed. phil, thank %ou. obesity rates in america have been growing quickly and steadily for decades. but finally a sliver of good news about the country's health. the new numbers on your children are next. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! >>> a potential bright spot is in the battle against childhood obesity. obese rates among young children in low income homes dipped. the rate began dropping 8 or 9 years ago and by 2010 fell below 15%. while the drop was comparatively small, researchers say it's the first study to show it may be on the decline after tripling the last 30 years. with us, doctor kerry peterson. doctor, good to see you. are you enc
washington works or doesn't. 31-year-old newly elected congressman is heading into a capitol hill quagmire. he said he is ready to bring small town solutions to capitol hill to help prevent and avoidable "fiscal cliff. >> i'm confident there can still be a buzzer beater here where we can beat the clock and deliver on middle class taxes. >> congressman swalwell will be the second youngest member congress to be sworn in on january 3. he leaves sunday for d.c. to pick up his new keys to his office. >> good luck. >>> next week secretary of state hillary clinton is going back to work at the state department after a three-week hiatus. you may recall she has been recovering from a concussion she suffered when she fainted while fighting a stomach virus. a spokesman says clinton is look forward to resuming her schedule. on that schedule, testifying before congress about the deadly attacks on a u.s. consulate in libya this past september. >>> russia is work on talks to end a 21-month-old conflict in syria. the syrian government is ready to talk with its opponents. now russian's foreign minister is c
, for those folks who do not want to work, we should send them home. mr. obama was elected, so live with it. he is the president. i want to do my fair share. if i am ok with paying a bit moe taxes to make sure our country gets out of this quagmire. god bless america. host: that was larry in massachusetts. the lead editorial this morning in the financial times -- again, that's from the financial times. michael vincent, statin island, new york. good morning. caller: good morning. pastor of one world life systems. on the darkest day of 1990 in washington, d.c., i began my ministry. that is something people don't realize, especially those who attack those who work with the indigent or support for the struggling -- or the poor. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand.
with a ton of news from the presidential election to the newton shooting. as we say hello to 2013. we want to know what you think the top stories of year. head over to fox friends first . there is two polls to vote on one is for 2012 and lighter side entertainment stories of the year . we will reveal the results live on monday, new year's eve if you can believe it or not. i can't believe it is new year's eve. "fox and friends" first starts right now. have a great day. >> julia: good morning. i am julia hedy in from gretchen. last call in hopes of rescuing off of the fiscal cliff. all that is getting debated is who is at fault and what is the president's plan. according to the white house there is no new proposal. >> and is russia vladimir putin playing with children's lives . what he just did. >>> and the newspapers that published the names of licensed gun owners. fox and friends starts right now. ♪ >> julia: hello, everybody. >> three days left. three days left before we go head first over the fiscal cliff. >> julia: before we talk about the fiscal cliff. you did cavuto. you did o'riell
powerful. he will say whatever he does is right. congress. they are elected. but they are experts in popularity. believe me, they know popularity. if they did not, they would not be where they are. now, this document gives the same rights and protections basically to the least popular person in the united states has to the most popular. so you are not going to get them to do it often when it is a question of the least popular. that leaves the judges and if you read 78 it's not that he felt that they were so wonderful. what he thought is that is the best choice available so we will give them the power who are they? we don't know, perfect. nobody knows their name, wonderful. they're the bureaucratic types and they do not have the power of the purse or of the sword. so we give them the power to declare what the others are doing is contrary to the constitution and that's the reason we can't think of anything better. it then takes a long time, close to 200 years before that power becomes effective and the thing on it and the study has is the study of slippery and of segregation. why? b
some leverage because he won the election but i thought both sides had and they were very close to a deal, gregg. that is the crazy thing here. they were very close. we had implosions in terms of the boehner leadership unable to hold his troops together. gregg: right. >> these guys are close. i think at this point, part of the negotiating dynamic is if we get close to the i have cliff you can get the troops to line up behind you and say, don't do it. that is terrible for the american people. that is bad way to run the government. gregg: mary katherine, no way to run a government but we've been saying that for 200 years. and i have too. but, mary katherine, look, what does it say about boehner's leadership, when he can't even get a vote on his own plan? >> no, i think that was a good opportunity for republicans to pass something. i think many of them made a mistake in foiling that plan because i think it was a decent one that had good points even though they obviously didn't get everything they wanted. i still think this could go either way. you guys point out this is no way to r
this elected president. i've written a few pieces before i saw that, so i have some basis of research, particularly on his mother. i think when i get home from this incredible kenyan journey, onto canvas sides of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins interweaving these two incredibly different worlds that helped create this unique person. >> host: who came up this title? >> guest: i did. just bouncing around out of africa and then i said out of africa come out of hawaii come out of kansas come out of indignation at our chicago, out of this world. and so that's what i'm thinking. the book is two things. it's a world that created obama and then how he re-created himself. so i'm not sure if there's proportions yet. it will be important for me to get it right. perhaps even the first half of the book are not quite that much come at the main characters and even on at. and then come in the second half of the book is largely chicago in california, new york and boston thrown in sun. the likes of chi
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)